miyapridelander:

ネクスト・トゥ・ノーマル - next to normal
2013 Japanese Production

Photoset #2/?

CAST:
Kei Aran (& Sylvia Grab) - Diana
Yuji Kishi - Dan
Ryosei Konishi (& Gen Shin) - Gabe
Eri Murakawa - Natalie
Kousei Matsushita - Henry
Niiro Shinya - Dr. Madden

Source: a b c

♥ 8 — 5 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via alternativememes (source)

buffyssummerses:

n2n + popular text posts

♥ 104 — 5 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via alternativememes (source)

theatre challenge | 6/8 songs → Wish I Were Here

♥ 1917 — 5 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via rememberpurplesummer (source)

mugglebornheadcanon:

824. The first vegan student is a muggleborn, and at the opening feast they don’t know what to eat and end up asking to go to bed before the rest. When they get to their dorm room, they find a house elf there who asks if they didn’t like the food and the muggleborn rushes to explain her predicament. The next day, all the dishes have little labels next to them that say things like ‘vegan’, ‘halal’, ‘lactose-free’, etc.

♥ 2021 — 5 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via mugglebornheadcanon
albinwonderland:

sunspotpony:

shugarskull:

thisisemobuddy:

juliaofthepnw:

Whatever.

Go forth elven prince of the mountains

He must be a half elf because Elves can’t grow beards

Gimli and Legolas’s true son.

bless everything about this post

albinwonderland:

sunspotpony:

shugarskull:

thisisemobuddy:

juliaofthepnw:

Whatever.

Go forth elven prince of the mountains

He must be a half elf because Elves can’t grow beards

Gimli and Legolas’s true son.

bless everything about this post

♥ 119817 — 5 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via river-canary-of-doom (source)
liegh42 inquired:

I have a character that slowly (but surely) goes insane throughout the novel. She starts off a little insane, being able to see ghosts and all, but at the end of it she goes completely nuts and ends up killer her father (well, that's the plan at least). How can I still make this character relatable? Her situation is no the most common (with some people it is I guess...) so I imagine it's hard to make people like her. Have any tips?

characterandwritinghelp:

elumish:

Firstly, you have so many negative mental illness tropes in this that I’m not sure where to start.

I don’t know what you mean by “insane”. It’s not a medical term, and though it is a legal term, it doesn’t refer to what I assume you mean to say, which is delusional or having hallucinations (which would probably be termed psychotic.

By saying she is able to see ghosts, you are implying that ghosts are real and that she has the ability to see them. Which is a fine premise for a story. I have no issue with that. The thing is, though, that if she has the ability to see ghosts which do exist, she is not hallucinating, so I don’t know how she’s insane. And if she is hallucinating the ghosts, then she can’t see ghosts, she hallucinates, in which cases she likely has either a brain tumor or any in a set of mental illnesses that has hallucinations as one of its symptoms.

Again, I don’t know what you mean by “goes completely nuts.” Does she have a psychotic break? Does she have a nervous breakdown? Does she begin to exhibiting erratic decision-making processes? Does she begin to have delusions? Does she begin to experience the symptoms of other mental illnesses (i.e. schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc.)? Does she lose touch with reality, as with psychosis? Does she begin to have more than just audio-visual hallucinations the ghosts (if they have hallucinations)? If the ghosts aren’t hallucinations, what do they have to do with the psychotic break?

Why does she kill her father? Presumably she doesn’t wake up one day and decide that she wants to kill him for no apparent reason. Did she exhibit prior violence? Is it because she loses touch with reality and believes that he is somebody else or that she isn’t killing him? Does she want to kill him? If so, why?

I might be being harsh, but the problem is that vague and incorrect ideas about mental illness are a major reason for the incredible stigma against people will mental illnesses. Precision is important, and so is the acknowledgement and understand that mental illness does not equal violence. Being mentally ill does not necessarily make a person violent, and most crimes committed by the mentally ill are found to be unrelated to their illness.

I want to tack some links (and personal commentary) on to this already quite fine answer.

Using the Insane Equals Violent trope does a huge disservice to people living with mental illness. Real life people suffer from mental illness, and perpetuating the idea that someone who has or develops a mental illness simultaneously develops a propensity for violence and committing violent crime (when the opposite is far more likely to be true) is a harmful way to create cheap drama in a story.

Mental illness is not a prop for writers to use to motivate characters. It is a real world thing that affects a lot of people. Similarly, the explanation of “she goes completely nuts” on its own is not a diagnosable mental illness. This is more an example of Hollywood Psych (or even Rule of Cool), in which a writer shirks off doing the research involved in accurately writing a mental illness in favor of writing it in the most “interesting” way for the story.

The way media includes and talks about mental illness absolutely affects how the general populace sees mental illness. You owe it to yourself, to your story, and to your audience to do your due diligence when it comes down to this. Please seriously think about the role mental illness plays in your story and the message it sends about people who live with mental illness.

-Headless

♥ 87 — 6 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via characterandwritinghelp (source)
Awesome Sites and Links for Writers

ghostflowerdreams:

Just about every writer out there has several go-to websites that they use when it comes to their writing. Be it for creativity, writer’s block, to put you in the mood or general writing help. These are mine and I listed them in hopes that you’ll find something that you’ll like or will find something useful for you. I’ve also included some websites that sound interesting.

Spelling & Grammar

  • Grammar Girl — Grammar Girl’s famous Quick and Dirty Tips (delivered via blog or podcast) will help you keep your creative writing error free.
  • The Owl — is Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab (OWL) it’s a great resource for grammar guides, style tips and other information that can help with your writing, especially academics.
  • Tip of My Tongue — have you ever had trouble of thinking of a specific word that you can’t remember what it is? Well, this site will help you narrow down your thoughts and find that word you’ve been looking for. It can be extremely frustrating when you have to stop writing because you get a stuck on a word, so this should help cut that down. 
  • Free Rice – is a great way to test your vocabulary knowledge. What’s even better about this site is that with every correct answer, they donate 10 grains of rice to the United Nations World Food Program. So, please disable your adblock since they use the ads on the site to generate the money to buy the rice.
  • HyperGrammar — the University of Ottawa offers up a one-stop guide for proper spelling, structure, and punctuation on this site.
  • AutoCrit — the AutoCrit Editing Wizard can check writing for grammar errors, clichés and other no-no’s. It also provides a number of other writing resources as well.
  • Writer’s Digest — learn how to improve your writing, find an agent, and even get published with the help of the varied blogs on this site.
  • Syntaxis — it allows you to test your knowledge of grammar with a ten-question quiz. The questions change every time you take the quiz so users are sure to be challenged each time around. It definitely helps writers know if there’s something that they need to brush up on.
  • Word Frequency Counterthis counter allows you to count the frequency usage of each word in your text.

Tools

  • Copyscape — is a free service that you can use to learn if anyone has plagiarized your work. It’s pretty useful for those that want to check for fanfiction plagiarism.
  • Write or Die —  is an application for Windows, Mac and Linux which aims to eliminate writer’s block by providing consequences for procrastination.
  • Written? Kitten! — is just like Write of Die, but it’s a kinder version. They use positive reinforcement, so everytime you reach a goal they reward you with an adorable picture of a kitten.

Information & Data

  • RefDesk — it has an enormous collection of reference materials, searchable databases and other great resources that can’t be found anywhere else. It’s great to use when you need to find something and check your facts.
  • Bib Me — it makes it easy to create citations, build bibliographies and acknowledge other people’s work. This is definitely something that academics will love. It’s basically a bibliography generator that automatically fills in a works cited page in MLA, APA, Chicago or Turbian formats.
  • Internet Public Library — this online library is full of resources that are free for anyone to use, from newspaper and magazine articles to special collections.
  • The Library of Congress — if you’re looking for primary documents and information, the Library of Congress is a great place to start. It has millions of items in its archives, many of which are accessible right from the website.
  • Social Security Administration: Popular Baby Names — is the most accurate list of popular names from 1879 to the present. If your character is from America and you need a name for them, this gives you a accurate list of names, just pick the state or decade that your character is from.
  • WebMD — is a handy medical database loaded with information. It’s not a substitute for a doctor, but can give you a lot of good information on diseases, symptoms, treatments, etc.
  • Google Scholaris an online, freely accessible search engine that lets users look for both physical and digital copies of articles. It searches a wide variety of sources, including academic publishers, universities, and preprint depositories and so on. While Google Scholar does search for print and online scholarly information, it is important to understand that the resource is not a database.
  • The Old Farmer’s Almanac — this classic almanac offers yearly information on astronomical events, weather conditions and forecasts, recipes, and gardening tips.
  • State Health FactsKaiser Family Foundation provides this database, full of health facts on a state-by-state basis that address everything from medicare to women’s health.
  • U.S. Census BureauLearn more about the trends and demographics of America with information drawn from the Census Bureau’s online site.
  • Wikipedia — this shouldn’t be used as your sole source, but it can be a great way to get basic information and find out where to look for additional references.
  • Finding Data on the Internet — a great site that list links that can tell you where you can find the inflation rate, crime statistics, and other data.

Word References

  • RhymeZone — whether you’re writing poetry, songs, or something else entirely, you can get help rhyming words with this site.
  • Acronym Finder — with more than 565,000 human-edited entries, Acronym Finder is the world’s largest and most comprehensive dictionary of acronyms, abbreviations, and initials.
  • Symbols.com — is a unique online encyclopedia that contains everything about symbols, signs, flags and glyphs arranged by categories such as culture, country, religion, and more. 
  • OneLook Reverse Dictionary — is a dictionary that lets you describe a concept and get back a list of words and phrases related to that concept. Your description can be a few words, a sentence, a question, or even just a single word. 
  • The Alternative Dictionaries — is a site that you can look up slang words in all types of languages, including Egyptian Arabic, Cherokee, Cantonese, Norwegian and many, many others.
  • Online Etymology Dictionary — it gives you the history and derivation of any word. Etymologies are not definitions; they’re explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago.
  • MediLexicon — is a comprehensive dictionary of medical, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and health care abbreviations and acronyms.
  • Merriam Webster Online – the online version of the classic dictionary also provides a thesaurus and a medical dictionary.
  • Multilingual Dictionary – that translate whatever you need from 30 different languages with this easy-to-use site.

Writing Software

  • Open Office — why pay for Microsoft products when you can create free documents with Open Office? This open source software provides similar tools to the Microsoft Office Suite, including spreadsheets, a word processor, the ability to create multimedia presentations, and more.
  • LibreOfficeis a free and open source office suite. It was forked from OpenOffice.org in 2010, which was an open-sourced version of the earlier StarOffice. The LibreOffice suite comprises programs to do word processing, spreadsheets, slideshows, diagrams and drawings, maintain databases, and compose math formula.
  • Scrivener — is not a free program, but it’s certainly a very popular one. It’s great for organizing research, planning drafts, and writing novels, articles, short stories, and even screenplays.
  • OmmWriteris a free simple text processor that gives you a distraction free environment. So you can focus only on your writing without being tempted or distracted by other programs on your computer.
  • Evernoteis a free app for your smartphone and computer that stores everything you could possibly imagine losing track of, like a boarding pass, receipt, article you want to read, to do list, or even a simple typed note. The app works brilliantly, keeping everything in sync between your computer, smartphone, or tablet. It’s definitely a useful app for writers when you have ideas on the go.
  • Storybook — this open source software can make it easier to manage your plotlines, characters, data, and other critical information while penning a novel.
  • Script Frenzy — scriptwriters will appreciate this software. It offers an easy layout that helps outline plots as well as providing storyboard features, index cards, and even sound and photo integration.

Creativity, Fun & Miscellaneous

  • National Novel Writing Month — is one of the most well-known writing challenges in the writing community, National Novel Writing Month pushes you to write 50,000 words in 30 days (for the whole month of November).
  • WritingFix — a fun site that creates writing prompts on the spot. The site currently has several options—prompts for right-brained people, for left-brained people, for kids—and is working to add prompts on classic literature, music and more.
  • Creative Writing Prompts — the site is exactly what it says. They have 100+ and more, of prompts that you can choose from.
  • My Fonts — is the world’s largest collection of fonts. You can even upload an image containing a font that you like, and this tells you what it is.
  • Story Starters — this website offers over one trillion randomly generated story starters for creative writers.
  • The Gutenberg Project — this site is perfect for those who like to read and/or have an ereader. There’s over 33,000 ebooks you can download for free. 
  • The Imagination Prompt Generator  Click through the prompts to generate different ideas in response to questions like “Is there a God?” and “If your tears could speak to you, what would they say?”
  • The Phrase Finder – this handy site helps you hunt down famous phrases, along with their origins. It also offers a phrase thesaurus that can help you create headlines, lyrics, and much more.
  • Storybird – this site allows you to write a picture book. They provided the gorgeous artwork and you create the story for it, or just read the stories that others have created.
  • Language Is a Virus — the automatic prompt generator on this site can provide writers with an endless number of creative writing prompts. Other resources include writing exercises and information on dozens of different authors.

Background Noise/Music

  • SimplyNoise — a free white noise sounds that you can use to drown out everything around you and help you focus on your writing.
  • Rainy Mood — from the same founders of Simply Noise, this website offers the pleasant sound of rain and thunderstorms. There’s a slide volume control, which you can increase the intensity of the noise (gentle shower to heavy storm), thunder mode (often, few, rare), oscillation button, and a sleep timer. 
  • Coffitivity — a site that provides three background noises: Morning Murmur (a gentle hum), Lunchtime Lounge (bustling chatter), and University Undertones (campus cafe). A pause button is provided whenever you need a bladder break, and a sliding volume control to give you the freedom to find the perfect level for your needs and moods. It’s also available as an android app, iOS app, and for Mac desktop.
  • Rainy Cafeit provides background chatter in coffee shops (similar to Coffitivity) AND the sound of rain (similar to Simply Rain). There’s also individual volume and on/off control for each sound category.
  • 8tracksis an internet radio website and everyone can listen for free. Unlike other music oriented social network such as Pandora or Spotify, 8tracks does’t have commercial interruption. Users create free accounts and can either browse the site and listen to other user-created mixes, and/or they can create their own mixes. It’s a perfect place to listen to other writer’s playlist, share yours or find music for specific characters or moods.
♥ 4299 — 6 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via characterandwritinghelp (source)
#ref  #writing  

Olavo Cavalheiro as Gabe Goodman in the Brazilian production of Next to Normal (dedicated to ohdaae)

♥ 25 — 8 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via alternativememes (source)

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)

And this is why I am a trio-shipper. *whistles innocently*

(via last-snowfall)

♥ 96446 — 8 hours ago on 30 Sep 2014 — via blessthesefatbears (source)
♥ 4106 — 20 hours ago on 29 Sep 2014 — via carriepotter (source)